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Doc Mishler and friends

Doc Mishler last rode the coast road fifteen years ago with the two horses pictured on the right: Chief Free Spirit and Keep The Faith. At that time, Doc trotted from Montana to Washington D.C., by way of California, after surviving a cancer diagnosis and its treatment and reading the book, How Then Shall We Live, a text that weighs the question, “How shall I live, knowing I will die?”

What was then a personal journey to celebrate life after beating a terminal diagnosis is now a ride to raise our awareness of hunger, in particular regard to starving children.  Doc says, “There are children in the world who are so hungry that God cannot appear to them except in the form of food.”

This ride is Doc’s mission. For more information about his church community, please stop him on his way south along Highway 1.

Doc can use a place to board his horses each night, so stop to offer your place when you see him.  Today he’ll depart Pescadero to travel to Santa Cruz, then on to Monterey, and then El Sur Grande, a day’s ride southbound until San Diego, where he will then head east-northeast to D.C.

This post written by Anneliese Agren

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Dude gave me his name, but I didn’t ask his permission to share, so I’ll tell you that dude’s name is “Noah.”  Noah’s hitched rides from Shasta County to the San Mateo County coast.  He has no specific destination.  New Mexico, ultimately, then back home.

“Lightning Fields, New Mexico,” I suggested.  Noah hadn’t heard about Lightning Fields.  I told him about Just John, riding a tricycle, heading south a couple of years ago, and that his plan was to reach the southern end of the Coast Road, then turn east to New Mexico, bound for the Lightning Fields.

“An electrical dude,” observed Noah.  “I’ve been reading about Tesla and his inventions.”

Noah’s traveling south, dependent on hitchhiking to reach the next destination.  “Riding a bike would be better,” says Noah after I tell him about Just John riding his tricycle.  “More independence, travel at one’s own pace, stop wherever and whenever, and, more room to pack more supplies.”

Noah’s belongings fit within a modest-sized backpack, larger than what we slung across our backs when in school, but smaller than an expedition backpack, which may be more suitable for Noah’s coastal trek.  A black canvas shoulder bag holds items requiring frequent use, such as Noah’s bullet-shaped, stainless steel thermos.

Noah’s tanned skin from the past couple weeks of unseasonably warm temperatures contrast to this week’s winter weather of snow at 1,000 foot elevations and hail storms at sea level.  After a long rainy hitch that brought him through Marin County and across the Golden Gate, and a complicated navigation through the drizzly city, Noah got a ride from San Francisco, through Pacifica, around Devil’s Slide, then down the coast and up to Apple Jacks in La Honda.  “I’ve enjoyed two good woodstove fires and really good music in the past 24 hours.”

Atop Noah’s long, brown, sun-kissed curls, sits a green felt hat, with a stubby brim, adequate-enough to provide sun and rain protection.  Noah’s summer-weight, black pin-striped suit is layered underneath by a red tee, and a green wool v-neck sweater, topped by two thick scarves.  Birkenstocks on Noah’s sockless feet display signs of wear at the heels.

Next stop Santa Cruz, then maybe Monterey, unless Noah hitches straight into the Sur.

Keep an eye to the Coast Road for “Noah,” and, if you’re headed to the next town south, maybe offer him a lift.

Atop a table within the Henry Miller Library in Big Sur I found Cosmic Coastal Chronicles written by M.L. Fischer.  A man standing nearby, stepped closer to me, winked, and whispered, “I hear that if you buy one of this author’s books, he will sign it for you.”

I flipped open to page 1 and read, “My old Toyota pick-up droned steadily over undulating hills, past green waves of artichokes, toward Moss Landing and on to Santa Cruz with the promise of surf at Pleasure Point.  A kayak was strapped to the top, mountain bike hung on the back, and surf gear stashed under the camper shell.”

Two sentences that were convincing enough for me to buy this book.  At the register, the Library’s executive director, Magnus Torén, rang up my purchases and then I stepped outside to find that man, as I knew he was the M.L. Fischer who would sign his book for me.

The Library was celebrating the first issue of its literary journal, Ping•Pong, with a release party.  People circulated the Library’s bookstore selecting new reads, like I did, or sat chatting on the sunny deck of the Library, surrounded by a redwood grove.

I found the man reclined in a resin chair on the deck, enjoying redwood-dappled sunshine.  “Will the author sign his work?” I asked, handing over Cosmic Coastal Chronicles.  We introduced ourselves.  On the title page, across from the book flap stamped with Henry Miller Library’s “Libris Pistorum,” Meade wrote in black ball point ink, “Anneliese, Hope you enjoy.  M.L. Fischer.”

I thanked Meade.  We shared stories of our beloved California coast and then Magnus asked everyone who had been standing around drinking wine and conversing about books, art, music and the beautiful warm sunny afternoon in Big Sur, to take seats and enjoy readings by all the talented authors published in Ping•Pong.

Having returned to my Big Sur campsite, reclined in a beach chair with my newly-acquired pug-beagle puppy snuggled atop my lap, I read Meade’s chronicles of his adventures along the west coast.

Meade has lived in many California coast towns and has driven the coast from southern California to Vancouver, B.C.  Meade’s “ride” to roam the Coast Road is either an “old Toyota pick-up” or a Kawasaki 1100cc.

“Many times, during summers and weekends, this sturdy little truck, faded and rusty, has been my home.  The long bed accommodates my long frame.  A mat from a patio lounge fits between the wheel wells.  The built-in carpeted compartments give me storage and shelf space.  My pillow is stuffed against the back of the cab, and a long, thick sleeping bag is rolled and ready.  A battery powered lantern is stowed in a compartment along with a pup tent, mask and snorkel and assorted gear I’ve been too lazy to unload.  A good book is always stuffed under the sleeping bag in case I spend the night in some scenic turn-out along the road.  Naturally, a bottle opener and a cork screw are in the glove box at all times.”

“A road that may take many lifetimes to travel,” writes Meade.  “Sunset found me on the San Luis Obispo coast.  I think of this as the gentle coast, with its wide turn-outs beside rocky little beaches, slapped by perfectly starched little waves.”  (Question to Meade:  What’s a “starched” wave?)

Meade continues, “The view inland is of Hearst Castle and smooth rolling hills, like mounds of melting coffee ice cream.  There are big RVs with smiling retirees for neighbors.  Further north, past Ragged Point at Big Sur, the landscape erupts skyward.”  (Absolutely true!)

“This is a coast of narrow turn-outs, perched on cloud-high cliffs, with people stranger than myself parked in odd busses under the shadow of trees, plotting bizarre cures for mankind’s ills while chanting mantras and smoking copious amounts of pot.”

Meade meets some of these “strange” people at pull-outs when he parks to check out the surf conditions.  Ewing “lived up the road at a scenic turn-out in an old van.”  For income, Ewing “carved pot pipes for the surfers and hippie types.  He made enough from this to buy food and gas and that was pretty much all he wanted beyond just being able to live at Big Sur.”

A friend of Ewing’s who lived a bit further north, Robot, “lived in an old tent in a secret spot right off the highway.”  Robot also made money from carving little stone pipes and “watching cars” (like a parking lot security guard) parked alongside the road at surf spots.  Meade and Robot enjoyed “a friendship that lasted a couple of years, until he (Robot) moved down the beach to a place I’ve yet to locate.  He shared secrets of Big Sur and the delightful stories of his life and adventures, and I, more often than not, provided the beer, some epoxy from town and sometimes a “loan” of five or ten bucks.”

Meade’s coastal adventures include colorful characters, such as Ewing and Robot, and scenic descriptions of the coastscape, “A flock of birds argued enthusiastically in the tree above me, while the world of man was reduced to a thin line of cars passing far below.”  One of my favorite lines, “The comfortable patch of tall grass under the sprawling Live Oak, upon the ridge, above the rugged, always dynamic coast of Big Sur provides more nature than a hundred nature shows, with their carefully selected images.”

When not riding in his old Toyota or atop his Kawasaki, Meade takes to the water in a kayak at Elkhorn Slough, “A sudden darkness under the bridge of Highway One and I was officially out of the harbor and in the slough.”  Here Meade enjoys a brief respite from light pollution, “Then the magic began.  Suddenly there was almost no artificial light, only the distant house lights of rural south Monterey County.  The moon, low in the east, cast a broad avenue of ghostly white that led me ever onward.”

Or Meade’s ride becomes a surfboard, “My favorite surfing spot in Pacifica, in fact, my favorite in the Bay Area, was Rockaway Beach.  The beach is less than a half-mile wide, between two rocky points.  A channel through the reef at the south end leads to a line-up that you can paddle around.  You can slip into position without getting in the way of someone taking off on a wave.  The place breaks from two to three foot waves, until it closes out, which can be double overhead at times.”

Meade contributes his philosophic insights, such as, “As humans, we seem to need to find a reason, a greater purpose for everything, a natural law that causes it all to make sense to us.  I’m beginning to suspect that there really isn’t anything like that out there, that the order we discover is a product of our own minds.  Even the wonderful concept of ecology may be rooted in our persistent need for order and reason.”

In one night at my Big Sur campsite, I read through Meade’s Cosmic Coastal Chronicles.  Foxes visited, sniffing outside my tent, scaring the puppy to settle within my sleeping bag.  Absolutely original as a local’s guide book to travel on Highways 1 and 101, M.L. Fischer’s Cosmic Coastal Chronicles may also be compared to Jack Kerouac’s On The Road and John Steinbeck’s, Travels with Charley.  The next morning I hit the Coast Road south for a trot down to Nacimiento-Fergusson Road.

Now, as a re-read, Meade’s chronicles snapped me out of my winter hibernation (a doldrums as it were), and I’m re-inspired to hit the Coast Road in search of my own cosmic coastal adventures.  As Meade describes, “Each of these trips adds to the growing collage, the ongoing coastal trip.”

May the road rise to meet you too.

DSCN3336Not often one sees a horseman riding on Highway 1.

Not often, as in, Never.

Almost 100 years ago, J. Smeaton Chase, an Englishman who lived out the second half of his life in California, started from San Gabriel Valley, then rode south to San Diego, to then ride north to Mendocino.

Published in 1913, Chase’s California Coastal TrailsCalifornia Coast Trails by Joseph Smeaton Chase gives the modern reader a view into California’s sparsely populated coastal past.

But now we have Matthew and Hampton, our current equivalent of Chase and Chino (later, Anton, when he traded a tired Chino in Jolon). Matthew and Hampton are traveling the California Coast Trail, aka State Route 1, but their mission is not a horseback tour to see the sights. Matthew and Hampton are riding the coast to raise awareness for the Akha people in northern Thailand who are being displaced by Thailand’s Queen and mistreated by the police. Matthew first learned about the Akha in the early 90s when traveling Thailand. He was disgusted by the treatment of the Akha by their fellow countrymen, the policemen, who take ownership of Akha lands in the name of the Queen of Thailand.

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While waiting for me to write an update, how about you watch traffic on Highway 1 in Santa Cruz, in Pismo, and in Santa Barbara.

Hit the > Play button to get the vid going.

Where The Redwoods Meet The Sea
A History of Santa Cruz County and its People
Long-term exhibit
History Gallery 2nd Floor

The Museum of Art & History’s installation is devoted to a thematic and topical interpretation of county history, from its earliest days to its more recent past.

Dedicated to the uniqueness and diversity of Santa Cruz County and its residents, the exhibit describes native peoples, the Mission period, early immigrants, early industries, and more!

First out on the road, on a weekend morning, Chryslers and Dodges, convertibles
and sedans, rental cars for tourists. Next Gas 33 Miles

Black asphalt, solid yellow double lines, freshly-plowed fields. Umber sandstone
bluffs, black jagged rocks, white foam, and a cold, blue, shimmery-velvet Pacific.
Cabrillo Highway.

On the long straight-aways, seventeen Harley-riding bikers rumble two-abreast.

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From Pescadero to Santa Cruz is thirty-six miles, by the road which winds along the coast past Point Año Nuevo and Pigeon Point to the Bay of Monterey, and thence southeastward, through a rich and highly-cultivated farming region, to the old Spanish Mission on the hill, below and around which the modern town, one of the most beautiful and thriving in California, has grown up within the past fifteen years

What a glorious gallop we–Chirimoya and I–had over the clean, hard, undulating road on that autumn morning after I left Pescadero! Californians will understand me and pardon my enthusiasm, possibly sympathize with me in it; but you of the older and more staid and conventional East cannot do so, and I pass the description, as you would inevitably pass it if you came upon it in print.

Passing over a pine-clad spur of Santa Cruz mountains, which here come close down to the coast, we halted for a time to rest and look about. This is a famous place for gathering the pine-cones, with fragments of which ladies are wont to construct elaborately wrought picture.frames and other “ornamental” work, very ugly, and very effective as dust-catchers, but excellent things for presents to religiously inclined friends, who are thereby brought to a realizing appreciation of the force of the scriptural maxim, “It is more blessed to give than to receive.”

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I 💛the Rainbow Tunnel song by @alisonfaithlevy 🌈 heard @makeoutroomsf for @manicdpress @litquake 🤗 San Gregorio and North Bay stinky smoke horizon. Le Trou Normand.

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Days until manuscript completion

Final DraftNovember 30th, 2013
Dot i's and cross t's.